HIV/AIDS Control and Prevention with the Community

[2018] Crowdsourcing Designathon: A New Model for Multisectoral Collaboration

Methods: A designathon adapts the concept of a hackathon to design a community-based, multisectoral public health program. The purpose of our designathon was to create an HIV test promotion program for men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. This intensive 72-hour contest brought together eight teams with strengths in public health, design, advocacy, and communications. The incentive to participate was having the top-ranked campaign implemented in eight Chinese cities.

Conclusions: Our experience suggests that designathons are a simple, effective, and inclusive way to develop community-based, multisectoral health programs. Designathons could be used in a range of settings to make health programs more inclusive and people-centered.

Full text: BMJ Innovations. doi: 10.1136/bmjinnov-2017-000216

[2017] Crowdsourcing to promote HIV testing among MSM in China: Study Protocol for a Stepped Wedge Randomized Controlled Trial

Background: HIV testing for marginalized populations is critical to controlling the HIV epidemic. However, the HIV testing rate among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China remains low. Crowdsourcing, the process of shifting individual tasks to a group, has been increasingly adopted in public health programs and may be a useful tool for spurring innovation in HIV testing campaigns. We designed a multi-site study to develop a crowdsourced HIV test promotion campaign and evaluate its effectiveness against conventional campaigns among MSM in China.

Methods: This study will use an adaptation of the stepped wedge, randomized controlled trial design. A total of eight major metropolitan cities in China will be randomized to sequentially initiate interventions at 3-month intervals. The intervention uses crowdsourcing at multiple steps to sustain crowd contribution. Approximately 1280 MSM, who are 16 years of age or over, live in the intervention city, have not been tested for HIV in the past 3 months, and are not living with HIV, will be recruited. Recruitment will take place through banner advertisements on a large gay dating app along with other social media platforms. Participants will complete one follow-up survey every 3 months for 12 months to evaluate their HIV testing uptake in the past 3 months and secondary outcomes including syphilis testing, sex without condoms, community engagement, testing stigma, and other related outcomes.

Discussion: MSM HIV testing rates remain poor in China. Innovative methods to promote HIV testing are urgently needed. With a large-scale, stepped wedge, randomized controlled trial our study can improve understanding of crowdsourcing’s long-term effectiveness in public health campaigns, expand HIV testing coverage among a key population, and inform intervention design in related public health fields.

Full textTrials18, 447. doi: 10.1186/s13063-017-2183-1

[2016] Comparing the Effectiveness of a Crowdsourced Video and a Social Marketing Video in Promoting Condom Use among Chinese Men who have Sex with Men: A Study Protocol

Introduction: Crowdsourcing has been used to spur innovation and increase community engagement in public health programmes. Crowdsourcing is the process of giving individual tasks to a large group, often involving open contests and enabled through multisectoral partnerships. Here we describe one crowdsourced video intervention in which a video promoting condom use is produced through an open contest. The aim of this study is to determine whether a crowdsourced intervention is as effective as a social marketing intervention in promoting condom use among high-risk men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender male-to-female (TG) in China.

Method: We evaluate videos developed by crowdsourcing and social marketing. The crowdsourcing contest involved an open call for videos. Entries were judged on capacity to promote condom use, to be shareable or ‘go viral’ and to give value to the individual. 1170 participants will be recruited for the randomised controlled trial. Participants need to be MSM age 16 and over who have had condomless anal sex in the last 3 months. Recruitment will be through an online banner ad on a popular MSM web page and other social media platforms. After completing an initial survey, participants will be randomly assigned to view either the social marketing video or the crowdsourcing video. Follow-up surveys will be completed at 3 weeks and 3 months after initial intervention to evaluate condomless sex and related secondary outcomes. Secondary outcomes include condom social norms, condom negotiation, condom self-efficacy, HIV/syphilis testing, frequency of sex acts and incremental cost.

ReferenceBMJ Open, 6(10), e010755.